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10/12/2020

I have used the last two or three weeks to photograph toadstools. Last year I hardly found any, so I had planned a little more time. Amazingly enough I found quite a few of the red-hatted guys. Even in places where nothing was to be found in 2019.

Fly agarics are not very rare in themselves. They also do not belong to the endangered mushroom species. All you need to know is that they do not just grow somewhere, but have certain preferences. Toadstools live in symbiosis with certain trees. The tree is supplied by the fungus with minerals, such as phosphorus, and in exchange the fungus receives products of photosynthesis from the tree. In the case of toadstools, however, this does not work with any tree. They need birch or spruce. So if you are looking for fly agarics, you should look for these trees.

 

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' #1

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at the 'Wistinghauser Senne' in September 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' #2

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at the 'Wistinghauser Senne' in September 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' #3

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at the 'Wistinghauser Senne' in Oktober 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' #4

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at the 'Wistinghauser Senne' in Oktober 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' #5

Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) at the 'Wistinghauser Senne' in Oktober 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

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09/25/2020

It is well known that there are countless mushrooms and they surround us almost everywhere. Most of them we never get to see. Even the ones that populate the parks, meadows and forests in autumn we overlook most of them. A not so rare mushroom, but one that is nevertheless often overlooked, is the Common eartball (Scleroderma citrinum). It lives on sandy, dry soils and forms round to ovoid fruiting bodies. It does not have a stem. The fungus has no lamellae or pores. The spores are formed in the innards of the fungus. When they are fully ripe, the body of the mushroom simply bursts open. The fungus is poisonous and causes stomach ache and vomiting when eaten. I found the specimen on the photo below in a heath area. Well camouflaged and only to be seen from close up.

 

Common earthball (Scleroderma citrinum) #1

Common earthball (Scleroderma citrinum) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Common earthball (Scleroderma citrinum) #2

Common earthball (Scleroderma citrinum) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

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09/24/2020

The mushroom photography of the last few days has also meant that I have been walking a lot in the forest. Here are some photos I took on the way. They were taken in an area called 'Wistinghauser Senne', which is situated between the villages of Oerlinghausen and Stukenbrock on the southern slope of the Teutoburg Forest. Something like 15 to 20 kilometres to the east of my home town Bielefeld.

 

Pine trees at sunrise #1

Pine trees at sunrise, 'Wistinghauser Senne' (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Old pine trees at dawn

Old pines at dawn in September 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Pine trees at sunrise #2

Pine trees at sunrise, 'Wistinghauser Senne' (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Wind turbines in the Teutoburg Forest

Wind turbines in the Teutoburg Forest at dusk in September 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) #1

Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' in September 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) #2

Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) at 'Wistinghauser Senne' in September 2020 (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

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09/22/2020

Yesterday I was again at the place where I found the beautiful parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) last weekend. You never know exactly where beautiful mushrooms grow and even if you know a good spot, you cannot be sure that in later years there will be mushrooms there again. These small creatures, which are biologically neither animals nor plants, are extremely mysterious. But if the conditions are good in one place in a year's time, you have a good chance of finding more beautiful specimens there. This was also the case here, on a heather-covered slope of the Teutoburg Forest. I set off very early in the morning to be there before sunrise. So early the light is still very soft. I took pictures with the Fujifilm GFX 50R camera and the Fujinon GF 4/ 120 mm R LM OIS WR macro lens. Of course I also used a tripod.

Prints of the pictures are available in my online shop. If you want to visit the shop, you have to leave this website: www.farbenfrohebilder.de

 

Parasol mushroom in the first morning light #1

Parasol mushrooms in the morning light shortly before sunrise in the Teutoburg Forest (Germany).

 

Parasol mushroom in the first morning light #2

Parasol mushrooms in the morning light shortly before sunrise in the Teutoburg Forest (Germany).

 

Parasol mushroom in the first morning light #3

Parasol mushrooms in the morning light shortly before sunrise in the Teutoburg Forest (Germany).

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09/20/2020

Now, in mid-September, summer is slowly coming to an end and autumn is just around the corner. And with it the time of the mushrooms begins again. Although it is still relatively warm and dry, you can already find them. In a pine forest at the southern edge of the Teutoburg Forest I found a place with beautiful parasol mushrooms. One of the specimens growing there I have dedicated myself extensively with the camera.

 

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) #1

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) in September 2020, Teutoburg Forest (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) #2

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) in September 2020, Teutoburg Forest (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) #3

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) in September 2020, Teutoburg Forest (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

 

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) #4

Parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) in September 2020, Teutoburg Forest (Oerlinghausen, Germany).

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09/13/2020

Occasionally plants have strange names. Like this sneezeweed. The scientific name is Helenium. The eponym here was Helen of Troy from Greek mythology. At least that is what it says in the literature. This is also a bit strange, because the plant in its wild form comes from the American continent. However, the cultivated form on the two photos below is named after the female German first name 'Waltraut'. Today this name is not very common anymore, but it was quite popular in the generation of my parents and grandparents. How this sneezeweed came to this name, I do not know. Now, of course, I have done some research to find out what 'Waltraut' means. In modern German, the origin of the name is no longer clear. The answer is that the first name is very old and comes from an early form of the German language. The Old High German, which was spoken in the period before the 10th century. 'Waltraut' therefore means something like that: The strong one on the battlefield. I was lucky then. The flower has been extremely peaceful towards me. The German name of the plant genus is 'Sonnenbraut', which literally means sun bride. I photographed 'Waltraut' on a very sunny Saturday morning in the Botanical Garden in my home town Bielefeld.

Prints of the pictures are available in my online shop. If you want to visit the shop, you have to leave this website: www.farbenfrohebilder.de

 

Sneezeweed (Helenium 'Waltraut') #1

Sneezeweed (Helenium) in the Botanical Garden Bielefeld (Germany).

 

Sneezeweed (Helenium 'Waltraut') #2

Sneezeweed (Helenium) in the Botanical Garden Bielefeld (Germany).

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09/11/2020

On a small meadow at the 'Johannisfriedhof' - a cemetery in my hometown Bielefeld - I came across a yellow coneflower a few days ago. The plant itself was anything but impressive, but against the green background of the meadow and with the shallow depth of field it was a nice photo opportunity. It was early in the morning and the cemetery was still in the shade. But it was already bright enough for a photo and the soft light brought out the colours nicely.

The photo was taken with the Fujifilm GFX 50R camera and the Fujinon GF 4/ 120 mm R LM OIS WR Macro lens. I used a tripod and a remote release cable. Without a tripod it is hard to take a good quality photo of such a macro subject. The blossom never really stood still. There was almost no wind, but it took a few tries until I could take a picture in good technical quality. You always have to have a little patience.

Prints of the pictures are available in my online shop. If you want to visit the shop, you have to leave this website: www.farbenfrohebilder.de

 

Yellow coneflower (Rudbeckia)

Yellow coneflower (Rudbeckia).

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09/10/2020

The history of the Botanical Garden in Bielefeld dates back to the early 20th century. Originally, the grounds were intended as an extension of a nearby cemetery. However, at that time, it was probably quickly realized that the site on the southern slope of the Teutoburg Forest was very well suited for a park. The location at the edge of the forest is characterized by favorable soil conditions and many hours of sunshine. For several months now, work has been underway to expand the botanical garden and a new pond has also been created. The two pictures were taken on a Sunday morning in best late summer weather.

Prints of the pictures are available in my online shop. If you want to visit the shop, you have to leave this website: www.farbenfrohebilder.de

 

New pond at the Botanical Garden Bielefeld #1

Botanical Garden Bielefeld early in the morning on 9 September 2020 (Germany).

 

New pond at the Botanical Garden Bielefeld #2

Botanical Garden Bielefeld early in the morning on 9 September 2020 (Germany).

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09/03/2020

The 'Bockschatzteich' is located in the Bielefeld district of Brackwede directly on the Cologne-Hanover railroad line. This is a small reservoir, which probably many people in Bielefeld do not know. It lies in a small forest area. I was there a few days ago. When I set out on my way late in the afternoon, the sky was just about closing in and it even rained a little. But in the course of the evening the sky loosened up again and at sunset there was a really nice light atmosphere.

 

Cloudy sky with a rainbow

Sunset with rainbow at 'Bockschatzteich' in August 2020 (Bielefeld-Brackwede, Germany).

 

Sunset at the Bockschatzteich #1

Sunset at 'Bockschatzteich' in August 2020 (Bielefeld-Brackwede, Germany).

 

Sunset at the Bockschatzteich #2

Sunset at 'Bockschatzteich' in August 2020 (Bielefeld-Brackwede, Germany).

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08/22/2020

As is well known, flash is often very useful in photography. When you have less natural light than you need it, or to lighten shadows and reduce too much contrast. Most of the times, one wants to avoid that everybody can see that the flash was intended. But you can also use flash light in such a way that it is visible for everyone and use it as a creative element. I tried this yesterday and chose some sunflowers on a field.

I used a Fujifilm GFX50R camera with the Fujinon GF 3.5/ 50 mm R LM WR lens and two Nissin i60A flashes with the Air 10s control unit.

Prints of the pictures are available in my online shop. If you want to visit the shop, you have to leave this website: www.farbenfrohebilder.de

 

Sunflower flash fun #1

Sunflower flash fun on August 21, 2020 (Bielefeld, Germany).

 

Sunflower flash fun #2

Sunflower flash fun on August 21, 2020 (Bielefeld, Germany).

 

Sunflower flash fun #3

Sunflower flash fun on August 21, 2020 (Bielefeld, Germany).

 

Sunflower flash fun #4

Sunflower flash fun on August 21, 2020 (Bielefeld, Germany).

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